THE RANT THREAD

Statto

Free Kick Specialist
Thing is, I'm kind of actually in agreement with those who say giving people a pay rise probably isn't going to solve the inflation issues (whatever euphemism one gives it, that's what it is).

Taken to a fundamental level with key jobs such as hauliers, shop assistants, people who work in kitchens etc... who ordinarily are also lower-paid workers and who would benefit more from a pay rise, they also work for companies who typically, can't afford to pay more because (other than cutting directors' salaries, bonuses etc which ultimately should be a considered scenario) it would mean they need to put the costs of their product up as well.

What we are partially seeing with rising prices now is the result of things such as the shortage of hauliers from a few months back and the need to pay the ones we have more, this puts up the cost of transporting goods across the country, and means people need to pay more to receive the items, this affects almost everything as almost everything needs to be transported, if you then consider a restaurant having to cope with this and then also wanting to put their chef's wages up too, then they will need to charge more for their food and drinks, this means people have to pay more for things which cost them less... they then want a pay rise.

The answer for this, unfortunately, cannot lie with wages, and cannot lie with costs of goods. It's not going to be possible to cut anything that way so the increase in costs has to be subsidised from something which doesn't affect the cost of the goods, which also means people can spend the same with the money they do have. In other words, cutting taxes.

I understand we have to pay the costs of furlough and covid restrictions for two years but then some of us did point this out at the time... This is the cause of the issue because whilst we need to we can't really cut taxes because we still have the debt from paying people to do nothing for a while.

Of course, this stems from the same root causes of any inflation issue, that there's too much money relative to goods in the economy. Again, this is because we shut down services and industries and gave people free money which they have chosen not to spend. And ironically, now they have to spend it, they can't afford to spend it on as much, because that's what happens when you print money for nothing.

It's not going to be popular and not going to be long term successful because they will find havens or move, but we need to be cutting general tax like on fuel and sales and increase higher rates of income tax.
 

Captain Sinister

Senior doom Monger
Thing is, I'm kind of actually in agreement with those who say giving people a pay rise probably isn't going to solve the inflation issues (whatever euphemism one gives it, that's what it is).

Taken to a fundamental level with key jobs such as hauliers, shop assistants, people who work in kitchens etc... who ordinarily are also lower-paid workers and who would benefit more from a pay rise, they also work for companies who typically, can't afford to pay more because (other than cutting directors' salaries, bonuses etc which ultimately should be a considered scenario) it would mean they need to put the costs of their product up as well.

What we are partially seeing with rising prices now is the result of things such as the shortage of hauliers from a few months back and the need to pay the ones we have more, this puts up the cost of transporting goods across the country, and means people need to pay more to receive the items, this affects almost everything as almost everything needs to be transported, if you then consider a restaurant having to cope with this and then also wanting to put their chef's wages up too, then they will need to charge more for their food and drinks, this means people have to pay more for things which cost them less... they then want a pay rise.

The answer for this, unfortunately, cannot lie with wages, and cannot lie with costs of goods. It's not going to be possible to cut anything that way so the increase in costs has to be subsidised from something which doesn't affect the cost of the goods, which also means people can spend the same with the money they do have. In other words, cutting taxes.

I understand we have to pay the costs of furlough and covid restrictions for two years but then some of us did point this out at the time... This is the cause of the issue because whilst we need to we can't really cut taxes because we still have the debt from paying people to do nothing for a while.

Of course, this stems from the same root causes of any inflation issue, that there's too much money relative to goods in the economy. Again, this is because we shut down services and industries and gave people free money which they have chosen not to spend. And ironically, now they have to spend it, they can't afford to spend it on as much, because that's what happens when you print money for nothing.

It's not going to be popular and not going to be long term successful because they will find havens or move, but we need to be cutting general tax like on fuel and sales and increase higher rates of income tax.
Prices rising because of a mismatch of supply and demand.
Vacancies now surging ahead of labour supply.
Therefore the excess of demand for Labour over supply of labour should drive wages higher.
In the NHS there are over 100,000 unfilled vacancies.
Nurses and ancillary staff are poorly paid.
Why then do market forces not drive wages higher?
Inflation and pay rise restrictions are political issues.
And the Tories do SFA about profiteering by capitalists while stamping on the necks of labour.
 
Last edited:

Lefkasman

Steve Chettle
Prices rising because of a mismatch of supply and demand.
Vacancies now surging ahead of labour supply.
Therefore the excess of demand for Labour over supply of labour should drive wages higher.
In the NHS there are over 100,000 unfilled vacancies.
Nurses and ancillary staff are poorly paid.
Why then do market forces drive wages higher?
Inflation and pay rise restrictions are political issues.
And the Tories do SFA about profiteering by capitalists while stamping on the necks of labour.
Always been the same. We can't afford to pay you anymore,the company really can't afford it. Yet we have to give bankers and the like massive salaries to keep the talent. Thatcher used to come out with the same shite. They despise the working man and the thought of paying him a decent wage really grinds their gears.

Sent from my M2003J15SC using Tapatalk
 

Rzarecteh

Ian Bowyer
Thing is, I'm kind of actually in agreement with those who say giving people a pay rise probably isn't going to solve the inflation issues (whatever euphemism one gives it, that's what it is).

Taken to a fundamental level with key jobs such as hauliers, shop assistants, people who work in kitchens etc... who ordinarily are also lower-paid workers and who would benefit more from a pay rise, they also work for companies who typically, can't afford to pay more because (other than cutting directors' salaries, bonuses etc which ultimately should be a considered scenario) it would mean they need to put the costs of their product up as well.

What we are partially seeing with rising prices now is the result of things such as the shortage of hauliers from a few months back and the need to pay the ones we have more, this puts up the cost of transporting goods across the country, and means people need to pay more to receive the items, this affects almost everything as almost everything needs to be transported, if you then consider a restaurant having to cope with this and then also wanting to put their chef's wages up too, then they will need to charge more for their food and drinks, this means people have to pay more for things which cost them less... they then want a pay rise.

The answer for this, unfortunately, cannot lie with wages, and cannot lie with costs of goods. It's not going to be possible to cut anything that way so the increase in costs has to be subsidised from something which doesn't affect the cost of the goods, which also means people can spend the same with the money they do have. In other words, cutting taxes.

I understand we have to pay the costs of furlough and covid restrictions for two years but then some of us did point this out at the time... This is the cause of the issue because whilst we need to we can't really cut taxes because we still have the debt from paying people to do nothing for a while.

Of course, this stems from the same root causes of any inflation issue, that there's too much money relative to goods in the economy. Again, this is because we shut down services and industries and gave people free money which they have chosen not to spend. And ironically, now they have to spend it, they can't afford to spend it on as much, because that's what happens when you print money for nothing.

It's not going to be popular and not going to be long term successful because they will find havens or move, but we need to be cutting general tax like on fuel and sales and increase higher rates of income tax.
I saw a post on Twitter the other day, this is just me off the cuff but it's something like this. You earn £100, £45 is taxed. Then you go and fill up fuel with £50, and £25 of that is taxed, and buy some booze whilst paying with the final £15, and another £8 of that is taxed. So from your £100, almost £80 is taxed. It's a complete piss take.

They also should have done much more about electricity/gas/fuel prices. For me, companies took Russia or whatever else as an excuse to hike up prices when really they didn't have too.

I am paying about £150 a week in fuel at the minute. I can't wait to get electric, but by the time everybody is electric I bet those prices are designed to rip us off too.
 

Statto

Free Kick Specialist
I saw a post on Twitter the other day, this is just me off the cuff but it's something like this. You earn £100, £45 is taxed. Then you go and fill up fuel with £50, and £25 of that is taxed, and buy some booze whilst paying with the final £15, and another £8 of that is taxed. So from your £100, almost £80 is taxed. It's a complete piss take.

They also should have done much more about electricity/gas/fuel prices. For me, companies took Russia or whatever else as an excuse to hike up prices when really they didn't have too.

I am paying about £150 a week in fuel at the minute. I can't wait to get electric, but by the time everybody is electric I bet those prices are designed to rip us off too.
Pretty much yeah, especially with utility costs as they are, you're going to be swapping filling your car with expensive fuel for charging it with expensive electricity, and having a much lower range and needing to find charging points where you are.

The amount of taxation is batshit crazy at the moment but then, like I said, we were all wanting furlough, business support and the government isn't an empty money pot. Nor can they keep taking tax holidays as they still need to pay the debt back more so as interest rates are going up (bad for borrowers, good for savers).

Let's be fair, there is only so much the gov can do to regulate the activities of private companies, without passing legislation of course. So, the amount which is tax notwithstanding, the utility firms, and the fuel companies, are as you say, acting disgracefully too with their attitude to hiking prices. I have no problem with them raising prices to cover their costs (and even directors' salaries, bonuses etc are contractual - the issue is them being there, not them being paid once they're agreed to) but they should lower them when the cost goes down too. Fuel prices are going down at the moment (in terms of them actually getting the fuel) but they are just putting them up constantly and it's making the issue worse for everyone. I remember when Rishi put in the 5p a litre tax cut - Some places did it, and then put the prices up past it within a day or two, others didn't and just absorbed the tax cut for themselves, this behaviour is entirely what you'd expect out of avaricious enterprise but totally unethical.

As a rank and file capitalist fundamentally (but with some social responsibility lol) it pains me to say it but in reality key national industries such as the railways (though private companies should still be able to run services like bus companies do), fuel supply, electricity, gas, water etc, maybe even internet and mobiles, should be nationalised, so that these core services are directly under the control of government and not of shareholders and directors who are simply into filling their own bank accounts.
 

Statto

Free Kick Specialist
Or even just regulate them harder and make them work under stricter rules.

If fuel prices double, fuel companies shouldn't be making the same profits - if not more.
Not gonna work. They will have clever enough advisors to find some loophole allowing them to register in some overseas tax haven and just milk away whatever they have.

Not sure if Brexit's affected it but Amazon was always based in LUX for this reason, they could trade extensively in the UK as a company based in an EU member state, allowing them to benefit from trading under the single market and whilst having premises and staff in the UK, without actually having a base here, could just simply avoid paying UK tax.

If there's a loophole to find, some will find it. Safer to nationalise, less hassle, better deal all round.
 

Magamar

First Team Squad
Pretty much yeah, especially with utility costs as they are, you're going to be swapping filling your car with expensive fuel for charging it with expensive electricity, and having a much lower range and needing to find charging points where you are.

The amount of taxation is batshit crazy at the moment but then, like I said, we were all wanting furlough, business support and the government isn't an empty money pot. Nor can they keep taking tax holidays as they still need to pay the debt back more so as interest rates are going up (bad for borrowers, good for savers).

Let's be fair, there is only so much the gov can do to regulate the activities of private companies, without passing legislation of course. So, the amount which is tax notwithstanding, the utility firms, and the fuel companies, are as you say, acting disgracefully too with their attitude to hiking prices. I have no problem with them raising prices to cover their costs (and even directors' salaries, bonuses etc are contractual - the issue is them being there, not them being paid once they're agreed to) but they should lower them when the cost goes down too. Fuel prices are going down at the moment (in terms of them actually getting the fuel) but they are just putting them up constantly and it's making the issue worse for everyone. I remember when Rishi put in the 5p a litre tax cut - Some places did it, and then put the prices up past it within a day or two, others didn't and just absorbed the tax cut for themselves, this behaviour is entirely what you'd expect out of avaricious enterprise but totally unethical.

As a rank and file capitalist fundamentally (but with some social responsibility lol) it pains me to say it but in reality key national industries such as the railways (though private companies should still be able to run services like bus companies do), fuel supply, electricity, gas, water etc, maybe even internet and mobiles, should be nationalised, so that these core services are directly under the control of government and not of shareholders and directors who are simply into filling their own bank accounts.

Agree with a heck of a lot of what you’ve said, however, what are the odds of tax cuts before the next GE?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Statto

Free Kick Specialist
I also remember about 20 years back you could get stuff off places like play who were based in the channel islands (a British crown dependency, but not part of the EU or UK) much cheaper because VAT wasn't chargeable on low-value exports from CI into the UK. (Guernsey is also lovely for holidays, been there loads). Somehow I recall this ended up getting less popular.

I regularly still buy music from places in the EU, often it still works out cheaper - recently the tax has been zero, but again smaller imports don't pay import duty (I haven't been charged yet) and you usually get it before the item's out in the UK as well.
 

Statto

Free Kick Specialist
Agree with a heck of a lot of what you’ve said, however, what are the odds of tax cuts before the next GE?


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
Reasonable I'd say.

Sunak may be loaded, but he's nowhere near stupid and is a good economic mind.

He's probably trying to see how long he can hold out on the increased taxation knowing he will actually need to cut it.

Johnson is a populist. He knows it will make him popular if he cuts taxes and make his Chancellor a hero too. So he will probably be in favour of it too.

It's like you have a week left of cheap booze before the cost goes up. You're going to spend that whole week in the pub aren't you? This is probably the same.
 

Lefkasman

Steve Chettle
Went to get my washing out this morning and it's soaked. Washer won't go on spin. I knew it was feeling it's age that's why the previous owners left it me. Ordered a new one, I ll fit it I said to the woman on the phone. Good job I did , the isolation valve was totally knackered. Why is nothing bloody simple.

Sent from my M2003J15SC using Tapatalk
 

Raymondo Ponte'

It's all about mid-table...
Went to get my washing out this morning and it's soaked. Washer won't go on spin. I knew it was feeling it's age that's why the previous owners left it me. Ordered a new one, I ll fit it I said to the woman on the phone. Good job I did , the isolation valve was totally knackered. Why is nothing bloody simple.

Sent from my M2003J15SC using Tapatalk
Gerra washboard n a mangle Lefk
 
Top Bottom